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My research focuses on representations of human rights violation and/or traumatic experience in narrative form, and the social, cultural, gendered and familial contexts in which such works are  produced.  In doing so I make considerable use of biographical, autobiographical and archival materials: letters, journals, draft manuscripts, notebooks etc. I am interested in a wide range of storytellers, both literary and otherwise, from the 18th Century to the present day.

 

As a development of this interest in auto/biographical materials, in 2007 I developed the Centre for Life Narratives at Kingston University (now the Life Narrative Research Group), the hub of an international research network that brings together scholars, practitioners and writers of all genre of life narratives for funded research projects, seminars, conferences and readings.

My most recent research is in the area of life story-writing and telling for the support of well-being for survivors of trauma, and investigates whether form is an influential factor in the success of such interventions.

A recent applied project, funded by the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, assessed the effectiveness of Expressive Writing methodologies in supporting the well-being of women victims of sexual violence in conflict in Iraq.

Dr Meg Jensen

My research focuses on representations of human rights violation and/or traumatic experience in narrative form, and the social, cultural, gendered and familial contexts in which such works are  produced.  In doing so I make considerable use of biographical, autobiographical and archival materials: letters, journals, draft manuscripts, notebooks etc. I am interested in a wide range of storytellers, both literary and otherwise, from the 18th Century to the present day.

 

As a development of this interest in auto/biographical materials, in 2007 I developed the Centre for Life Narratives at Kingston University (now the Life Narrative Research Group), the hub of an international research network that brings together scholars, practitioners and writers of all genre of life narratives for funded research projects, seminars, conferences and readings.

My most recent research is in the area of life story-writing and telling for the support of well-being for survivors of trauma, and investigates whether form is an influential factor in the success of such interventions.

A recent applied project, funded by the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, assessed the effectiveness of Expressive Writing methodologies in supporting the well-being of women victims of sexual violence in conflict in Iraq.

My current critical analytical work (Negotiated Truths: The Art and Science of Trauma and the Autobiographical, Palgrave 2018) evaluates a range of life narrative forms that represent traumatic experience (memoir, testimony, poetry, graphic novels, monuments, autobiographical novels, etc) and considers the relationship between such works and current behavioural, psychological, and neurochemical approaches to diagnosing and treating traumatic disorders.

Finally, my practice-based research takes the form of creative non-fiction and autobiographical novels concerned with representations of traumatic experience.